Foreshades of Grey (3)

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Illustration by Fragonard of Letter 10 ‘O mon ami, lui dis-je… Pardonne-moi mes torts, je veux les expier à force d’amour’, Les Liaisons Dangereuses (1796 edition) Image source: Wikipedia

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Illustration by Fragonard of Letter 44 ‘Je ne lui permis de changer ni de situation ni de parure’
for 1796 edition of Les Liaisons Dangereuses. Image source: Wikipedia

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Illustration by Marguerite Gérard, who was the sister-in-law and pupil of Fragonard, of Letter 96 ‘Valmont entrant dans la chambre de Cécile endormie’ for 1796 edition of Les Liaisons Dangereuses. Image source: Wikipedia

The greatest novel about erotic power, gender politics and psychological manipulation was written by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos and first published in 1782. It became famous again towards the end of the 20th century when it was adapted into a play (1985) and subsequently a screenplay (1988) by Christopher Hampton. There have been several other adaptations, in period and modern dress, including the 1959 French film directed by Roger Vadim, starring Jeanne Moreau, the TV mini-series starring Catherine Deneuve (2003) and the Hollywood teenage treatment in three films.

Its influence extends far beyond officially credited versions; Merteuil and Valmont have reappeared in different incarnations ever since, as sexual, social or political schemers, because Laclos demonstrated psychopathological prototypes in their characters.

The original epistolary book is unsurpassed, both for the shock at the amorality and cruelty inherent in civilized society, and the subtlety of Laclos’ understanding of human nature, including his recognition of sexual equality far ahead of his time.

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Fragonard The Bolt c. 1777 Oil on canvas Musée du Louvre, Paris. Image source: Web Gallery of Art

Fragonard painted many voyeuristic, sexually suggestive scenes, far more blatantly erotic than the insouciance of The Swing – naked young girls rolling about with fluffy dogs, that sort of thing – with his characteristic joyful lightness of touch, but this painting, as noted on WGA, shows signs of a serious moral involvement on the artist’s part. There’s none of Boucher’s artificial pastoral sauciness; there’s real violence in the strong diagonals, the turbulent swirl of her skirts, the closest to a condemnation of forced seduction as rape we will find in Rococo art. “No” means no, here. The woman could be the virtuous Madame de Tourvel, struggling with her conscience as she succumbs to Valmont.

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3 comments on “Foreshades of Grey (3)

  1. PJR says:

    I read it years ago in a battered, second hand edition of a traditional translation – and was hooked. There must be more true-to-the-original modern translations about now, in any reputable publisher’s classics list – eg Penguin. It is more about using sex for psychological power than sex itself – it’s not Sadeian – but very seductive. Much more so than the banal films. I also recommend Diderot’s The Nun – no kidding. Amazing lesbian scenes. Again, available in Penguin, or Everyman’s Library.

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  2. erickeyswriter says:

    I did see a film adaptation of this book that was quite good. I forget which version it was. I may have to get a copy of the book. Is there a translation you recommend? My French never progressed past the ordering of meat and booze.

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  3. beetleypete says:

    ( Catherine Deneuve. Now you’re talking….)

    This is an enjoyable series indeed, and I love the illustrations. I also have a lot of time for the Malkovitch/Close pairing in the film, which I greatly admired.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

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