About

myths and histories of a reluctant blogger

“For whom is your blog?” I was asked by a beautiful blonde lawyer posing a killer direct question in the gentlest of tones. I was nonplussed. She’d found me out.

I hadn’t thought about a target audience. With unwavering politeness, she filled up my silence by suggesting that “writing to please yourself is probably the best way to start” and, conscious of wasting time umming and erring, too embarrassed to make an emotional declaration (we were in a public bar, not a consulting room), I didn’t dare demur, even though I knew it wasn’t the whole truth.

This is a confession. All the dead queens and dionysian poets who haunt this place, enchantedthe bugbears and hobbyhorses, the great actors and Master Bettys, all the ghostly performances, some good, some awful; heroines and heroes overthrowing tyranny with witty one-liners; young women bravely stepping out to claim liberty and equality in a new world wearing see-through dresses and pearls, while crowds cheer yet another emperor‘s new clothes (eye-witness accounts being no more or less true than fantasy); all the pleasure gardens and painted illusions, the aching arcs of beauty and the secrets kept between the lines, are for someone in particular, who can’t see or talk about them any more.

I’m continuing the conversation, but now it’s one-sided, just me talking to myself. It’s nuts, in fact. Is all blogging insane? Are we shouting at each other across the void to drown out the sound of our fear?

Once I can get my head round WordPress, please eavesdrop, please interrupt, please comment, if you want to. There are inconsequential posts, pompous posts, rambling posts; you are not going to like all, or, perhaps, any of them. There are pictures, though, masses of pictures, and what is the use of a blog, the modern Alice might think, “without pictures or conversations?”

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20 comments on “About

  1. PJR says:

    Your fall visit has made me very happy, Adrienne. I value your opinions, respect the depth of your historical and literary knowledge, admire your writing and respect your moral judgments. It’s salutory to be reminded that part of the British “Brexit” problem is not realizing how Fringe (off-off-Broadway) and unimportant we are nowadays. (Take my word for it – “Brexit” may look like a storm in a teacup to America, it might have eighth or ninth billing in world drama, but it’s a sign of the effeteness of our civilization. It’s our Trump, it’s made of the same grandiose delusions and zenophobic instincts, and it will destroy our economy, our environment and diplomatic relations with the rest of the world, it’s the resurgence of demagogic fascism, just when we all need to be united in common causes. The world hasn’t been in such danger for at least two generations, and Britain’s response is to be silly.)

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Just thought I’d stop by, Pippa, to wish you well this autumn. Just read your last post about Brexit. As an American I don’t have a strong opinion on it but love the fact that you write not for follows and likes and say what you want to say. It inspired me today.

    Love
    A

    Liked by 1 person

  3. beetleypete says:

    Thanks for following RFF, Pippa. Much appreciated, as always. Pete. x

    Like

  4. […] This is a confession. All the dead queens and dionysian poets who haunt this place, the bugbears and… […]

    Like

  5. erickeyswriter says:

    “I’m looking forward to exploring your own blog in depth”

    Thank you. An engaged audience means more to me than almost anything this world can offer. For me, writing has always been about dialogue and interaction.

    “and have already been impressed by the drama and energy of your story-telling, by the authenticity and the cold shuddering at the climax”

    I am humbled.

    “so maybe I will be “tricked” into a bigger leap.”

    I will try not to over play my hand and scare away my prey – er, potential reader!

    “I think writers and actors are dependent on being “liked” by an audience in a way painters, sculptors and photographers are not”

    The only serious sculptor I knew was delightfully unconcerned about his work being appreciated. He was one of my favorite people. He had a humility that surprised me over and over – definitely not the mad artist of stereotypes and bad movies.

    “I don’t know about musicians. I am grateful to you.”

    I am grateful to you, as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. PJR says:

    I’m looking forward to exploring your own blog in depth, and have already been impressed by the drama and energy of your story-telling, by the authenticity and the cold shuddering at the climax, so maybe I will be “tricked” into a bigger leap. I think writers and actors are dependent on being “liked” by an audience in a way painters, sculptors and photographers are not; I don’t know about musicians. I am grateful to you.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. erickeyswriter says:

    Such lovely pictures, too! And such a lovely hostess. I took a peek at your Pippa Rathborne Actress page. Anyway, I hope I can, in some small way, contribute to the conversation that would make Alice give a sigh of relief.

    Perhaps, one day, I will trick you into reading one of my eBooks!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. PJR says:

    Lori – thank you for kind comments and likes – I’m always flattered and mortified when someone sincere “Follows” me because I’m frequently convinced the last post really will be the LAST post. You’ve got a far more erudite and enthusiastic blog of your own which I love peering into.

    Like

  9. lori says:

    This sounds like a lovely place. Never mind the lawyer. 😉

    Like

  10. beetleypete says:

    I noticed that I had neglected to comment here.
    Any mention of ‘The Emperor’s New Clothes’ is always worth a comment. For me, it is the best example of the exposure of sycophancy ever written.
    Best wishes as always, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. hassanizzo says:

    After reading this page, I’m looking forward to reading many more of your posts

    Like

  12. PJR says:

    Yes, so did I!! Sorry……

    Liked by 1 person

  13. And thank you for following Rogues & Vagabonds. I thought you already were and am furious that you weren’t!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. myipadography says:

    Looking forward to all yiu have to offer.

    Like

  15. Thank you so much for following First Night History!

    Like

  16. This is one of the best “About”s I’ve ever read. Keep it up. (No pressure 8^).

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Candia says:

    Thanks for following my posts. It will be interesting to see what you are writing too.

    Like

  18. Excellent and enticing!

    Like

  19. Looking forward to what you will write here!

    Like

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